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Navitas Organics Blog

Max Darcey, Navitas Organics Manager of Quality & Sustainability

Recent Posts

How We Use Business as a Force for Good and What it Means for You

As B Corp Month and the start of February kick off, we at Navitas thought this would be a great opportunity to discuss our commitment to a movement we wholeheartedly believe in and are proud to be a part of. In the words of Ghandi, we must all seek to “Be the Change that we wish to see in the world” – for if not, what hope is there for future generations? This is the inspiration to our commitment to B Corp.

Conventional business wisdom is often narrow in its focus on profit-driven outcomes, frequently leaving commitments to sustainability and longevity behind. But we believe that considering a long-term, sustainability-based vision of a company can create resiliency and loyalty, while also securing profits for the lifetime of the brand. Being a B Corp certified company is part of how we do this. Our hope is to change that short-sighted mentality by showing firsthand that strong values and a commitment to our stakeholders; customers, employees, partners, environment and society can be profitable and reformative.

So, what does B Corp mean? It means we’re held to standards by an unbiased, third-party entity (B Corp) that holds us accountable for our impacts on social and environmental performance, public transparency and legal accountability to balance our profit with our purpose. At Navitas Organics, that means our commitment to Fairtrade, our commitment to organic and non-GMO products, our partnerships with environmental organizations such as A Growing Culture, our commitments to healthy living and non-profits like Ceres Project and Conscious Kitchen, and last but not least, our amazing Wellness Program for our employees.

We’re in the midst of a cultural change that’s using business as a way to transform the economic engine. Consumers are the ones that play the most important role, as they hold the power to tip the scale and demand business and government accountability. Labels certifications like B Corp and so many others help consumers make the right decisions. “The B Corp community works toward reduced inequality, lower levels of poverty, a healthier environment, stronger communities, and the creation of more high-quality jobs with dignity and purpose. By harnessing the power of business, B Corps use profits and growth as means to a greater end: positive impact for their employees, communities and the environment.” As leaders in the superfood category, we want to make sure we’re using our business as a beacon for positive change and showing that corporate social responsibility can be achieved while making profits.

We were thrilled when we became B Corp certified two and a half years ago, but it was no easy walk in the park to get there. There were many challenges and lessons learned along the way to getting our assessment completed and approved, but looking back now, we can truly appreciate the level of detail and scrutiny involved in this process, because it helps create a level of transparency and authenticity that consumers and all shareholders can trust.
There’s so much energy out there surrounding this new model of business thinking and we’re inspired by the growing numbers of companies joining the movement. The future is bright and we’re so proud that we can take a hand in shaping a brighter tomorrow.

Not sure if your favorite brand is B Corp Certified? Click here to search the directory.

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Topics: health, healthy choices, superfoods, Navitas Organics, blog, healthy living, research, B Corp, sustainability, business, agriculture, economy

Why Farmer Autonomy Matters: Part Two

In part one, I introduced Loren Cardelli, president and co-founder of A Growing Culture (AGC), to provide some background and education on what his amazing organization does to support our farmers. In the conclusion of this interview, I ask some hard-hitting questions about what potential their work has for our food system and how we can make a difference as consumers.

MD: Given that a majority of your work is in rural areas internationally, what challenges do you face in spreading the knowledge about effective farming techniques? How does a farmer in Kenya learn from a farmer in Peru when they’re so disconnected from any form of technology?

LC: That’s one of the reasons why we share information both digitally and analogue. We are building one of the largest networks of participatory agricultural organizations that put farmers first. By doing this, we can reach out to these organizations and they become the arms that extend out of the digital community to the analogue. So, there is a digital connection there, but there’s also face-to-face knowledge sharing that we organize and support. This project isn’t just digitally focused – it’s not a technical solution for low tech, it’s a network and community that uses digital connection as just one of their tools. So, when a farmer in Kenya wants to share a technique with a farmer in Vietnam or Bolivia, that technique is not exactly replicated, but rather, it’s adapted, modified and built upon by the farmers in these other countries. This is the constant evolution of ideas and innovation that we’re trying to create.

MD: Do you see changes, systems or procedures internationally that you think could work for the United States’ food system?

LC: Absolutely. We received funding this past Fall for a project in Vietnam regarding pig farming. It’s an innovation in which the pig farmer creates a living, fermented bedding for the hogs (“living” means that it’s populated by indigenous microorganisms and bacteria that are thriving). It’s not a sterile, bleached environment, but rather a bedding material of carbon materials including rice, husks, wood chips and straw, which is then inoculated and alive. The urine and feces of the pigs are immediately broken down and digested by this community, so there’s no runoff or waste. This technique can be adapted and used even in industrial systems in North Carolina, Iowa, Canada, Switzerland or China, as well as by smallholder systems in Vietnam and other countries worldwide. We’re so excited about the scalability of this specific technique and its application in other areas.

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Topics: agriculture, blog, education, farmers, food, foods, health, healthy, information, sustainability

Why Farmer Autonomy Matters: An Interview with the President of A Growing Culture

Loren Cardeli, co-founder and president of A Growing Culture (AGC), has spent the last 10 years traveling the world, learning from farmers and realizing that farmers are our solution to the current environmental crisis. I sat down with Loren to learn more about the amazing organization he started, and how he aims to change the way we view farmers and their critical role in changing our food system.

MD: What inspired you to start A Growing Culture?

LC: My love of agriculture and farming has led me to explore communities around the world and learn how they’ve been growing their food. These experiences triggered my interest in this movement, but my “lightbulb” moment came from a personal experience I had while working in a community in Belize. We were growing our own food, living off our own produce, hunting our own meat, deep in the jungle. One day, I walked to a local community to purchase some chickens for dinner and heard someone screaming. I saw a man holding his young son, who looked pale and limp, and it turned out his son had mistakenly ingested pesticides that were used on his crops. Tragically, his son ended up dying. Seeing this shook me, but it also opened me up to understanding that there are two models of agriculture. Just a few blocks away, we were living organically, growing our own food and connected to the source, while this nearby community was connected to a logging road, and down that road was the access to market inputs, fertilizers and chemicals. This community had become dependent on these connections with industrial and chemical farming, and what blew me away was how close, yet how far away these communities were from each other. It showed me how the industrial model not only erodes the environment, but it also erodes the culture and the community. At that moment, I decided I wanted to work with farmers all over the world to unite and amplify their solution to a better food system for all, absent of foreign, chemical and dangerous inputs.

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Topics: blog, community, culture, food, healthy, information, organic, sustainability

Future Thinking: Our Part in Environmental Awareness

“You must own stock in the electrical company,” my dad would mutter, shaking his head as he went from room to room turning off the lights that my siblings and I left on in empty rooms around the house. I would frequently respond with a smart aleck comeback about how well my stock was doing. Eventually though, the point stuck, and now as an adult I think of this as one of the early influential lessons I learned about the importance of environmental awareness. 


I’m grateful for the experiences that have instilled a passion in me for environmental justice, sustainability and a commitment to help create a better world for the future. I’m even more grateful for the work I do at Navitas Organics that’s in line with these passions.

At Navitas Organics, we strive to make a difference – whether it’s through Fairtrade, B-Corp certification, a commitment to organic, non-GMO products or partnerships with environmental organizations such as A Growing Culture. One area that sometimes gets overlooked, however, is our local effort to operate our headquarters as efficiently as possible to help reduce our company’s impact on global climate change. So, today on National Cut Your Energy Costs Day, I’m here to highlight this important aspect of our commitment to reducing our carbon footprint.

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Topics: blog, conservation, energy, fairtrade, livelifepositive, superfoods, sustainability

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